Dine at Isaac’s For PAD!

If you’re local to Lancaster, dine with us on Wednesday, March 11th from 5pm – 9pm at Isaacs (4 Crosswinds Drive, Lititz, behind Pizza Hut!) and 25% of your bill to be donated to our program!  Take out and gift cards purchased during that time also count!  Don’t forget your voucher though – only diners with our voucher count!

LPN Stephanie Merrell sees first hand how assistance dogs benefit her patients:

Service dogs have played a vital role in creating independence in many of my patients. People without disabilities often take for granted small things, like being able to pick up something they’ve dropped. Without a service dogs assistance, this can be an insurmountable task for someone with a disability. Not only do they provide comfort and companionship, but they help instill confidence that their owner can achieve both large and small daily living tasks.

StephandKings

To download and print, right mouse click and go to file, print!  The fliers are double sided and 2 per page, so invite a friend – please!

IsaacsFlier1
IsaacsFlier2What will your donation go towards within PAD?  PAD is 100% volunteer based, meaning your donation goes directly towards our dogs in training and not a salary!  Some of our costs are:

  • $150 one year of flea and tick prevention medication for one service dog in training
  • $120 one year of heartworm prevention medication for one service dog in training
  • $275 to spay or neuter and microchip one service dog in training
  • $250 for hip and elbow x-ray evaluations for one service dog in training
  • $30 for one service dog in training harness (including patches)
  • and many, many more!

Last time we raised almost $400 at Isaacs!  Let’s try to raise $500 this year!

Assistance Dogs and Preparedness for Emergencies

The possibility of Hurricane Sandy hitting our area has caused us to discuss emergency evacuations and over all safety.

Assistance Dogs are permitted to enter any shelter, but we still encourage our teams to be fully prepared by also knowing where pets are permitted if they need to evacuate and the local shelter does not understand the law regarding assistance dogs. If teams are denied access, they can call the National Red Cross 24 hour access number, 1-866-GET INFO.

A service dog is defined under the American’s With Disabilities Act as a guide dog, signal dog, or any other animal individually trained to provide assistance to an individual with a disability. Assistance Dogs represent a specific group, different from pets or other animals such as therapy dogs.

The Red Cross specifically allows an individual with a disability the use of an assistance dog in its disaster or evacuation shelters; or we will make special arrangements to accommodate the individual, together with the assistance dog, within the facility or in another appropriate facility. In all such circumstances, the care and supervision of the service animal is the responsibility of the individual, and not that of Red Cross.

We recommend that partners put no less than one week of dog food in their fully fueled vehicle ahead of time, and packing the following:

  • An extra collar with proper ID
  • An extra leash
  • Two dog bowls
  • Clean up supplies (poop bags, etc)
  • Copies of their dogs;
    • county license
    • veterinary records
    • assistance dog public access letter provided by PAD
  • A current photo of their dog
We encourage our teams to put all of these items into a “to go bag” which is then put somewhere that they can easily access if the emergency level changes without notice. Near this bag should also be their assistance dog’s public harness or vest.  If your dog has a harness with packs, we encourage you to pack a safe weight amount of your dogs necessities in their packs, saving space and helping you manage your things.
Even though assistance dogs are highly trained and taught to handle stress, emergency evacuations can be an extreme situation for them.  It can be beneficial to have a chew toy, power treats and even a clicker packed for these situations. 
We hope that everyone takes time to plan for an evacuation, especially so for those with disabilities and assistance dogs.  Stay safe and be prepared!

PAD Milo Learns To Fly!

My nerves were making me feel sick. This was going to be Milos first time in an Airport and we will also be flying that day. I usually like to take the dogs to the airport once or twice before we actually fly to give them a dry run of all the comotion, going through security, and loading a plane (some airlines will let you board the last plane of the day after everyone is off–to let your dog experiance that, its very nice since it can be a tight space).

I woke up later than I had hoped to, and this didnt leave me with much time to walk Milo. Luckily, he went both number one and two before we left.

Once we arrived to the airport, it was PACKED. This really sent my stress levels through the roof with people rushing and hussling everywhere. Milo walked right next to me perfectly, unfased by any of it. We saw a few drug dogs–he looked interested in them, but kept quiet and calm at my side.

My Dad helped me get to the front of the line (there was a line out the door of the Airport-to get into another line to wait to get on line for security–was CRAZY!). On the account of my Vertigo I could not wait or stand in the line that long so was promoted to the front kindly. I said my fair-wells to my Dad as I made my way to security…

This was the first time I EVER been through security by myself…and I had a puppy to manage at the same time. People were still pushing and running around and I was starting to feel the panic pinching my chest, and buring my eyes. I told the security guy I needed a pat down on account of medical reasons–he put me in the shortest line for people with children or disabilities. I appreciated this. I told him this was my first time alone and I was not sure what to do or how this would work. He helped get me the bins and everything to put my stuff through the detectors. The mother of three kids in front of me turned to rub my arm and told me “you BOTH are doing great!”

I had to wait a few minutes to get my pat-down. The nicest older woman came to do it, she understood I couldnt hear and made sure she was looking at me. She was very reassuring the entire time, which really helped me a lot. She did my pat down with no problems while Milo sat at my side and watched patiently for his turn.

The security woman turned to Milo now for his pat down–which he VERY much enjoyed! We made small talk about Milo, how old he was, stuff he will do for me (the usual?). She kept telling me how perfectly behaved, how he didnt seem bothered by all the comotion or stressed people around, and how over all amazing he was! She couldnt believe this was his first time ever in an airport. I smiled, they were great compliments to give a 4 month old puppy!

From there we were on to our gate. They changed our gate, and our flight was delayed an hour. I followed someone to our new gate. Milo and I sat on the floor against the wall–he layed down next to me, and I was finally able to take a breath.

We had a few people come up to ask about Milo and Service Dogs in general. I was happy to talk about it since its something that I know and was keeping me “cool”.

A Pilot came over, we started talking and he kneeled next to us. He was so impressed with Milo and really was interested. He offered to take Milo out to relieve himself if needed. Since our flight was delayed, I knew Milo would probley have to pee. I handed Milo over to him and they went on their way.

He told me Milo was reluctant to leave me, and kept wanting to come back and find me. But once outside, he took a huge dump! (yea, I was kinda embarassed when he told me this LOL). As they were making their way back to me, they had to go through security–He was not sure what to do–and Milos easy walk, and collar kept setting off the alarm. So he undressed him and took him through the metal detectors. They went on an esculator, he held him and said Milo was kissing his face the entire time.

Once Milo saw me again he jumped into my arms (I was still sitting on the floor). I was so greatful he did this, and I know Milo appreciated it!

We sat and talked until the Pilot heard an announcement that they changed our gate number again.

I went up to the ticket lady and told her I needed to preboard. She was very rude and basically shoo-ed me away. My new Pilot friend told her what was going to happen, and he made sure Milo and I were the first ones on the plane.

Milo walked down the hall way to the plane, and onto the pane like a seasoned pro! I was very impressed since Macy is awful about this!

We sat in the first seat and people started to board. After awhile, a rude air hostess told me I had to move, i told her I need bulk head and she told me someone else paid for it. ANYWAYS, we made our way to our new seat (4A–a window seat), while there was a bit of leg room, there was just enough for Milo now and NO way he would fit there in a few moths. The Pilot appologized for the rude woman and kindly explained how this plane was “weird” and that the seat I was sitting in was “first class” and I was actually in Bulk head now…It made sence as I looked at the seats again so didnt complain.

We got a window seat; Milo spent a few minutes (5 min tops) trying to figure out how to place himself partly under the seat in front of us then curled up and went to bed before the hostess was even done with the safty procedures.

Milo didnt even wake up for take off, which was bumpy and stuff. He slept the entire flight in the little space he had, and I watched out the window and played with my phone. I was sure he would wake up for landing but he didnt–not even with the rough touchdown that felt like a crash. Our Pilot Pal, helped get my bags down while I woke little Mr. (Milo) up. So many people were going “I didnt know there was a puppy on the plane!!”.

We made our way off the plane easily. The Pilot asked where I needed to go, I told him we were to meet my BF at baggage claim and he said he will take us! This helped me SO much, the Atlanta airport is huge and I would of been so lost! We made our way around the place to the mono-rail and got on, Milo never been on one before but, again, acts like its nothing! The monorail when very fast and you are able to feel gravity pull you back, I had to hold on and Milo watched me the entire time with eager eyes as a teenage girl was coo-ing at him “AW! puppy! good puppy! sweet puppy”.

We got to bagage claim and made our way outside, where he waited with me until Joey showed up. I was SO greatful for everything the Pilot did, was way over and beyond!

Over all: Milo had no accidents in the Airport–which was good since the time he woke up on the plane to leave to getting out of the air port was a long long way!

He slept the entire flight, and was not afraid of anything (the airplane, people, commontion, ANYTHING)

I am SO SO PROUD of my little man! He did BETTER than PERFECT!

-Shoshana Rappaport, Milo’s owner, trainer and partner

PAD Milo Has His 1st Eye Test!

April 12th 2012 PAD Milo went to the Animal Eye Specialty Clinic of Palm Beach for a eye clearance exam. When we arrived the receptionist handed me drops to put in his eyes; I was a bit nervous putting the drops in but Milo was not scared and did not move. The drops were used to enlarge the pupils for the exam; because of this, his eyes were more sensitive to the light. We had to wait about 30 minutes for the drops to take effect. In the general waiting area there was an African Grey parrot who Milo showed no intrest in even when the bird said “hello” and “sit!”. There were a good number of other dogs coming in and leaving; Milo wanted to say “HI” to them and their owners but once he understood this was not play time he settled under the bench.

I let him meet the staff, and he met a Doctor wearing a operation clothing, and a face mask–none of this scared Milo. After we went back to the exam room the Doctor came in monents later. Milo greeted him with puppy kisses of course! He did amazing during the eye exam, and wagged his tail the entire time!


A big thank you to Shoshana Rappaport for this guest blog entry!

Dundee & Shadowlight Group

In training all of our dogs, we spend a lot of time proofing basic obedience cues such as “sit”, “down”, “come” and so on. ¬†Today Dundee had a very special opportunity to practice his incredible training with The Shadowlight Group ! ¬†Dundee was chosen to model in an advertisement for a Lowes kitchen! ¬†Dundee, and the world’s greatest 7 year old model, Jordan worked very hard from 9am – 1pm to get the perfect shot. ¬†Dundee learned to follow cues from a child, be off leash in a public building while remaining focused and even got to learn to new cues! ¬†Jordan (who we’re hoping wants to volunteer as a dog trainer someday!) taught Dundee to “dance” – stand on his hand legs, and to “shake” or give his paw! ¬†At the end of the day we left with one tired puppy, who was very eager to take a long nap in his crate! ¬†We would like to thank everyone at The Shadowlight Group, Lowes and Jordan for their hand in Dundee’s future as an assistance dog!

Don’t forget to enter what 3 breeds you think Dundee is before the DNA results come back for your chance to win a handmade dog or cat collar by Cody’s Creations!!

 

Trip to Christmas Village!

Dundee went on his first official PAD puppy training event today, and boy did he show off his skills.  Dundee did fabulous while we waiting for the other teams to arrive (about 15 minutes) even while crowds started forming lines around him, and speakers began blasting Christmas music (uncomfortably loud)!  Soon thereafter, Dundee had his first Dundee Christmas Trainingexperience of meeting another dog in public on leash.  PAD Sanuk is much older (6 months) and was very excited to have another dog with him at class.  While Sanuk’s handlers worked with him to get him to calmly join the class, Dundee sat and waited calmly.  Throughout the two hour visit he never got distracted by, or tried to play with Sanuk!  Way to go Dundee!  The majority of the event included meeting

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