Fundraising for PAD Gunner!

We are raising the funds to purchase one particular health guaranteed puppy to raise as our first potential stud dog, who will be the future of service dogs helping the disabled in our community. This 5 week old puppy, PAD Gunner, comes from generations of champion dogs ranging from obedience titles, show titles, and hunting titles.  Bred by Creekside Kennels in North Carolina.

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Each of these areas are uniquely important for an assistance dog stud. Champion obedience titles show a desire to learn and obey commands, while champion hunting titles show natural desire to retrieve and have a gentle mouth. Equally importantly, the champion show titles show solid physical stature which is crucial for pulling a wheelchair and mobility work. In addition, this puppy has multiple generations of health tests dogs in his background and comes with a solid “hip contract” meaning they guarantee his hips to be free of Degenerative Joint Disease.

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In order to continue meeting the needs of individuals living with a broad range of disabilities, we are working towards starting a small breeding program. This small breeding program will provide our program with puppies of suitable health and temperament in order for us to continue with our mission – to locate, raise and train dogs to provide greater independence to individuals living with a broad range of disabilities as well as to mentor and teach individuals that are training an assistance dog either for themselves or for a loved one. To read more about our program, and what sets us apart from other assistance dog programs please go to our website.

Our fundraising goal covers:

Puppy cost
Flight for pick up and delivery
Veterinary costs for 2 years
Basic Training Gear
Quality dog food for 2 years
Hip, Elbow and Health Clearances at 2

To contribute, please go to our FundRazr page! Or email us at info [at] padcentral.org for alternative ways to contribute, more information, or with questions!

Looking Towards The Future

After years of focusing solely on rescue and shelter puppies/dogs, we have decided to begin working with very small, highly devoted breeders to grow our program.  We don’t take breeding lightly, and will continue to always work closely with the community to bring in suitable puppies and dogs from our local shelters, rescues and as in the past, even test dogs within families that are in need of placing them.  Unfortunately, the dogs within the community that are suitable for assistance dog work are hard to come by and our waiting list for assistance dogs is growing by the month.  So in order to meet the needs of our local individuals with disabilities we have made this choice to begin working with breeders.  We do not have any specific breeding plans currently, but wanted to share the news with you as you are sure to see some changes in the future!

PAD Davy’s Fundraiser

PAD Davy visited our wonderful veterinarians today because we were concerned with one of his eyes.  Our team was very disheartened to learn that sweet Davy has entropion in one of his eyes that requires surgery.  Thankfully, the veterinarians are positive that with surgery, PAD Davy will be able to continue training with PAD and have no lasting affects!  If you’d like to read about entropion, you can click here.

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PAD Davy’s medication prior to surgery (scheduled for 2/19/13), surgery itself, and post op medications will be approximately $1,500.   Please consider making a small donation to help Davy get back to his training!  You can donate by clicking below or email us (info[at]padcentral.org) if you’d like to donate directly to the veterinary clinic!

Please consider sharing this on your blog or facebook page!

Growing Puppy Program!

Our waiting list of partners in need of a life saving fully trained assistance dog is growing, which means we need to grow the size of our Puppy Program!  Before we begin the search for more puppies, we need to recruit and train valuable volunteer Puppy Trainers!  Please consider how allowing a puppy to come into your home for approximately 2 years can change someones life forever!

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Assistance Dogs and Preparedness for Emergencies

The possibility of Hurricane Sandy hitting our area has caused us to discuss emergency evacuations and over all safety.

Assistance Dogs are permitted to enter any shelter, but we still encourage our teams to be fully prepared by also knowing where pets are permitted if they need to evacuate and the local shelter does not understand the law regarding assistance dogs. If teams are denied access, they can call the National Red Cross 24 hour access number, 1-866-GET INFO.

A service dog is defined under the American’s With Disabilities Act as a guide dog, signal dog, or any other animal individually trained to provide assistance to an individual with a disability. Assistance Dogs represent a specific group, different from pets or other animals such as therapy dogs.

The Red Cross specifically allows an individual with a disability the use of an assistance dog in its disaster or evacuation shelters; or we will make special arrangements to accommodate the individual, together with the assistance dog, within the facility or in another appropriate facility. In all such circumstances, the care and supervision of the service animal is the responsibility of the individual, and not that of Red Cross.

We recommend that partners put no less than one week of dog food in their fully fueled vehicle ahead of time, and packing the following:

  • An extra collar with proper ID
  • An extra leash
  • Two dog bowls
  • Clean up supplies (poop bags, etc)
  • Copies of their dogs;
    • county license
    • veterinary records
    • assistance dog public access letter provided by PAD
  • A current photo of their dog
We encourage our teams to put all of these items into a “to go bag” which is then put somewhere that they can easily access if the emergency level changes without notice. Near this bag should also be their assistance dog’s public harness or vest.  If your dog has a harness with packs, we encourage you to pack a safe weight amount of your dogs necessities in their packs, saving space and helping you manage your things.
Even though assistance dogs are highly trained and taught to handle stress, emergency evacuations can be an extreme situation for them.  It can be beneficial to have a chew toy, power treats and even a clicker packed for these situations. 
We hope that everyone takes time to plan for an evacuation, especially so for those with disabilities and assistance dogs.  Stay safe and be prepared!

Spotlight: Dexter

PAD Dexter is an easy going and gentle natured 13 week old rescued mixed breed puppy. Dexter is in our puppy program, and will be matched around 1 year of age to an individual with a disability on our waiting list. Once matched we will fine tune his training to the specific needs of his partner. Right now in training PAD Dexter is socializing with dogs, people and environments in order to become the well adjusted adult dog, he needs to be, to be a service dog!  He is growing fast, and at 12 weeks was already 24 lbs!  When in public, PAD Dexter wears a service dog harness and walks on an Easy Walk Harness, and is his volunteer Puppy Trainers are working hard on training sessions to teach him to walk nicely on a collar as well!  Will you consider donating the cost of one of these very important items?

In Training Harness w/ Patches: $35.00

Easy Walk Harness: $25.00

Head Collar: $38.00

Spotlight: Beamer


PAD Beamer is a wonderful 16 week old rescued golden retriever puppy. He is in our owner training program, which means his partner, 17 year old Alexa Vath, is training him to become her very own Hearing Dog!  Alexa is doing a wonderful job training and socializing her puppy, and we’re very proud of all of the work she’s done! She goes above and beyond the call of duty not only attending our classes for his assistance dog training but also puppy kindergarten at her local PetSmart! PAD Beamer is growing fast, and is in need of the next size up harness very soon. He also is learning to walk nicely on a loose leash, but at certain times uses an easy walk harness, and on other occasions, even a head collar. This allows Alexa to continue training him on the rules of the leash, while still manage him during public outings and socialization. Will you consider donating the cost of one of these very important items?¬†

In Training Harness w/ Patches: $35.00

Easy Walk Harness: $25.00

Head Collar: $38.00

Help Us Expand!

We have been slowly growing over the past few years, and are in need of purchasing new harnesses, as well as new training gear such as easy walk harnesses and head halters.

If you are able to help support our specific need, please consider chipping in, here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

PAD Milo Learns To Fly!

My nerves were making me feel sick. This was going to be Milos first time in an Airport and we will also be flying that day. I usually like to take the dogs to the airport once or twice before we actually fly to give them a dry run of all the comotion, going through security, and loading a plane (some airlines will let you board the last plane of the day after everyone is off–to let your dog experiance that, its very nice since it can be a tight space).

I woke up later than I had hoped to, and this didnt leave me with much time to walk Milo. Luckily, he went both number one and two before we left.

Once we arrived to the airport, it was PACKED. This really sent my stress levels through the roof with people rushing and hussling everywhere. Milo walked right next to me perfectly, unfased by any of it. We saw a few drug dogs–he looked interested in them, but kept quiet and calm at my side.

My Dad helped me get to the front of the line (there was a line out the door of the Airport-to get into another line to wait to get on line for security–was CRAZY!). On the account of my Vertigo I could not wait or stand in the line that long so was promoted to the front kindly. I said my fair-wells to my Dad as I made my way to security…

This was the first time I EVER been through security by myself…and I had a puppy to manage at the same time. People were still pushing and running around and I was starting to feel the panic pinching my chest, and buring my eyes. I told the security guy I needed a pat down on account of medical reasons–he put me in the shortest line for people with children or disabilities. I appreciated this. I told him this was my first time alone and I was not sure what to do or how this would work. He helped get me the bins and everything to put my stuff through the detectors. The mother of three kids in front of me turned to rub my arm and told me “you BOTH are doing great!”

I had to wait a few minutes to get my pat-down. The nicest older woman came to do it, she understood I couldnt hear and made sure she was looking at me. She was very reassuring the entire time, which really helped me a lot. She did my pat down with no problems while Milo sat at my side and watched patiently for his turn.

The security woman turned to Milo now for his pat down–which he VERY much enjoyed! We made small talk about Milo, how old he was, stuff he will do for me (the usual?). She kept telling me how perfectly behaved, how he didnt seem bothered by all the comotion or stressed people around, and how over all amazing he was! She couldnt believe this was his first time ever in an airport. I smiled, they were great compliments to give a 4 month old puppy!

From there we were on to our gate. They changed our gate, and our flight was delayed an hour. I followed someone to our new gate. Milo and I sat on the floor against the wall–he layed down next to me, and I was finally able to take a breath.

We had a few people come up to ask about Milo and Service Dogs in general. I was happy to talk about it since its something that I know and was keeping me “cool”.

A Pilot came over, we started talking and he kneeled next to us. He was so impressed with Milo and really was interested. He offered to take Milo out to relieve himself if needed. Since our flight was delayed, I knew Milo would probley have to pee. I handed Milo over to him and they went on their way.

He told me Milo was reluctant to leave me, and kept wanting to come back and find me. But once outside, he took a huge dump! (yea, I was kinda embarassed when he told me this LOL). As they were making their way back to me, they had to go through security–He was not sure what to do–and Milos easy walk, and collar kept setting off the alarm. So he undressed him and took him through the metal detectors. They went on an esculator, he held him and said Milo was kissing his face the entire time.

Once Milo saw me again he jumped into my arms (I was still sitting on the floor). I was so greatful he did this, and I know Milo appreciated it!

We sat and talked until the Pilot heard an announcement that they changed our gate number again.

I went up to the ticket lady and told her I needed to preboard. She was very rude and basically shoo-ed me away. My new Pilot friend told her what was going to happen, and he made sure Milo and I were the first ones on the plane.

Milo walked down the hall way to the plane, and onto the pane like a seasoned pro! I was very impressed since Macy is awful about this!

We sat in the first seat and people started to board. After awhile, a rude air hostess told me I had to move, i told her I need bulk head and she told me someone else paid for it. ANYWAYS, we made our way to our new seat (4A–a window seat), while there was a bit of leg room, there was just enough for Milo now and NO way he would fit there in a few moths. The Pilot appologized for the rude woman and kindly explained how this plane was “weird” and that the seat I was sitting in was “first class” and I was actually in Bulk head now…It made sence as I looked at the seats again so didnt complain.

We got a window seat; Milo spent a few minutes (5 min tops) trying to figure out how to place himself partly under the seat in front of us then curled up and went to bed before the hostess was even done with the safty procedures.

Milo didnt even wake up for take off, which was bumpy and stuff. He slept the entire flight in the little space he had, and I watched out the window and played with my phone. I was sure he would wake up for landing but he didnt–not even with the rough touchdown that felt like a crash. Our Pilot Pal, helped get my bags down while I woke little Mr. (Milo) up. So many people were going “I didnt know there was a puppy on the plane!!”.

We made our way off the plane easily. The Pilot asked where I needed to go, I told him we were to meet my BF at baggage claim and he said he will take us! This helped me SO much, the Atlanta airport is huge and I would of been so lost! We made our way around the place to the mono-rail and got on, Milo never been on one before but, again, acts like its nothing! The monorail when very fast and you are able to feel gravity pull you back, I had to hold on and Milo watched me the entire time with eager eyes as a teenage girl was coo-ing at him “AW! puppy! good puppy! sweet puppy”.

We got to bagage claim and made our way outside, where he waited with me until Joey showed up. I was SO greatful for everything the Pilot did, was way over and beyond!

Over all: Milo had no accidents in the Airport–which was good since the time he woke up on the plane to leave to getting out of the air port was a long long way!

He slept the entire flight, and was not afraid of anything (the airplane, people, commontion, ANYTHING)

I am SO SO PROUD of my little man! He did BETTER than PERFECT!

-Shoshana Rappaport, Milo’s owner, trainer and partner